Categorized | MUSIC, Traditional Regional Songs

REGIONAL QUADRAS- Ao Pe de mim

Posted on 19 January 2008 by chan

AO PE DE MIM TEM UM VIZINHO
AO PE DE MIM TEM UM VIZINHO
QUE ENRICOU SEM TRABALHAR
MEU PAI TRABALHO TANTO
MAS NUNCA PODE ENRICAR
NAO DEITAVA NUMA NOITE
QUE DEIXASSE DE REZAR HA HA
AGUA DE BEBER…

Close to me there was a neighbour
Close to me there was a neighbour
that became rich without working
My father worked very much
but he could never become rich
their wasn’t a night where he laid
without forgetting to pray ha ha
water to drink..

Regional quadras generally tell stories or are used to give advice.
There are always many layers to songs such as these, where there are so many possibilities for intepretation that many a time have I thought one year a song means this, only to be told that it actually means something completely different. Then, two years down the track, be told that it means something completely different again.

This song is a very common quadra. Most quadras in regional range from 4 to 6 to 8 verses long. (not including the repeated verses). Thus within the short amount of communication they rely on references to the past, metaphors, loose intepretations, and deceptiveness to give the song its layers.

This song on the surface is singing about a man who was both jealous and annoyed with his neighbour for getting ‘lucky’ and becoming rich.
within the next layer, it is singing about the inequality that many of the brazilian people have to deal with and come to terms with in their everyday life.
within another layer, he is singing about the fake capoeirista, that may seem to stand proud and tall and all of his students may see him in a big light, yet he is really hollow inside.

within yet another layer, he is singing about humankind, how regardless of who you are, you will forever think the grass is greener on the other side, you will forever have obstacles and others that may feel like a threat, yet, regardless, you keep the faith, the faith in yourself to keep going, and keep ‘praying’ every night.

Just a few intepretations but I am sure you could think of many more.

When to come in

If you are playing with the pandeiro, when you enter into each line the timing of the entry interchanges.
the first line comes in on the first beat. (as you’ll notice in the video above).
The second line will come in between the first and second beat of the pandeiro, and so on so forth.

With the berimbau, its a bit tricker.
REGIONAL VERBAL ANNOTATION:
TICH TICH DOM, TICH TICH DIM, TICH TICH DOM DOM DIM.
the first line begins on the first DOM, which is the third hit in the regional rhythm. Or sometimes (depending on your timing) can start on the first Dom in the second half of the regional berimbau rhythm.
The other lines that do not come in on those notes, come in in between the Dom and the Tich or the second and third hit.

POINTERS

Just a few things to point out:
1. Think about the tone of your voice. It is important to try and keep the structure of the tone. You may notice that on each bar there is a certain pitch that comes out, try and stick to it as much as possible.
2. Find the rhythm. Once you find it, it will be easy to know when to come in and out of it, but until you look, it is really hard to find.
3. Watch the pronounciations of the words. It is really easy to accidently change something and the word could come out completely wrong.
4. Pe in this context does not mean ‘foot’ it is a shortened way of saying perto, which means close.

Good luck, would love to hear your thoughts on whether these tutorials were easy to follow and if there was any suggestions on how to make them better.

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5 Comments For This Post

  1. Jonathan Says:

    Hi Chan

    if you’ve got the bandwidth, I could consume as many of these musical tutorials as you can produce! The production quality is excellent and I think we be quite a unique resource for those of us early in our journey – thank you.

    I’m fascinated with the layers in the songs – the concept is very similar to a technique used in Jewish Kabbalah used for understanding any teaching. You have Pashat – the literal meaning, Remez – a hinted or implied meaning, Drash – a deeper allegorical meaning, and Sod – hidden or mystical meaning. One who has the ability to understand all four level is closer to PRDS (PaRDeS) – which means a Garden, or what is often called Paradise.

    Your Garden anecdote in the previous blog entry now also takes on a new meaning for me too.

  2. chan Says:

    thankyou jonathan,
    I will try and be focusing on some of the songs a little more, they do take a while to film, edit and produce, but be patient and they will come.
    I am enjoying the process and I really believe that it will really give people who are unfortunate enough to not have the resources to learn this amazing art. You know what they say, Nothing is ever really yours until you can give it away.

    It is great to hear about the Jewish Kabbalah, you learn something everyday.

    I look forward to helping you with whatever I can.
    Chan.

  3. Kristin Chenoweth Says:

    Hi there…Thanks for the nice read, keep up the interesting posts..what a nice Saturday . Kristin Chenoweth

  4. Resmungo Says:

    I’d be interested in knowing what other kinds of lines can go in the louvação type part of the quadra along with agua de beber.

  5. Vedete Says:

    Thank you for this informative tutorial! I am studying for my next batizado and there are very few resources like this that I can work with! xox

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